NUSL Summer
Registration for Summer Program 2014
 
Northeastern University

400 Huntington Avenue
Boston, Massachusetts 02115
(617) 373-2395

Registration for Summer Program 2014 is not yet available. We are still working out the details and will open registration soon.

Please see below a list of courses we are planning to offer this summer. Once the list has been finalized, we will update this page and you will be able to use this page to register for Summer Program 2014.

Subject to Change
Note: "TBA" indicates that a course will presumptively be taught, but the instructor for the course has not been finalized. The course schedule is subject to change.

*Limited Enrollment Courses -

  • NUSL summer students may take limited enrollment classes, although NUSL JD students are given first preference.
  • In recent academic terms, some limited enrollment classes with long waiting lists have ended up not being full!
  • Enrollment is determined by instructor based on students who attend the first class.
  • If you get in, you must decide by the end of the first class if you plan to enroll.
  • You may not drop a limited enrollment class after the first class without permission of the instructor and the Office of Admissions.
  • If you drop a limited enrollment class before the start of the quarter, please let us know so we can try to keep the lists as up to date as possible.

**Clinics - Visiting students must receive approval from the clinic instructor to enroll in a clinic. Each clinic has its own selection process which often requires the completion of a questionnaire and receiving 30.3 certification. If you are interested in enrolling in a clinic, pease contact the Office of Admissions (lawadmissions@neu.edu) for instructions on how to apply.

Advanced Criminal Procedure: Adjudication  – This course closely examines some of the constitutional complexities in the prosecution and defense of criminal cases in state and federal courts.  Students investigate how the law fashions the adjudicatory process and how the law evaluates what is “fair” and what is “legitimate” in formally deciding on whom to impose punishment.  The course covers, among other things, pretrial detention, right to counsel, plea bargaining, discovery, trial processes, and sentencing.

Givelber

 

3 Credits

 

Antitrust – The federal antitrust laws, first created to break apart the powerful business “trusts” of the late 1800s, have since been applied to markets as diverse as utilities, ski areas, sports leagues, copy machine repair services, and computer hardware and software.  This course will explore the core principles of antitrust law, with an emphasis on three substantive areas: monopolization, horizontal merger analysis, and agreements among competitors.  Because antitrust cases and scholarship rely heavily upon economics, the course begins with an introduction to firm and market economics, and economic analysis plays a significant role in our discussions. 

Cooper

 

3 Credits

 

Basic Income Taxation – The introductory tax course covers the fundamental concepts and operations in income taxation.  Tax issues are raised in the context of typical lawyer-client situations: the employment contract (fringe benefits, employee business expenses), buying and selling a house and other property, personal injury expenses and recoveries, and running a small business.  An important aspect in understanding the details covered will be comprehension of the economic policy objectives, and unintended results, of specific tax provisions such as capital gains taxation.  The course is focused on the statute, cases and administrative law that define the income tax base.  Tax rates are also examined and tax unit issues are covered for individual wage-earners, married couples, children living in the home, pensioners and small businesses organized as sole proprietorships.

Salter

 

4 Credits

 

*Civil Trial Practice (Limited to 16 with 3rd year preference) – An introduction to the tactical and strategic problems commonly encountered in the trial of cases is the main objective of this course.  Although the focus of class discussion is directed toward civil litigation, the techniques and problems are common to criminal cases.  Attention is given to the forensic aspects of trial practice, techniques of direct and cross-examination, and opening and closing summations. +Prior course work in evidence is a prerequisite.

Rossman

 

2 Credits

 

Corporations -- This course related to the formation, financial structure, and governance of business enterprises, especially incorporated businesses.   Partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability companies and limited liability partnerships are also explored, principally as they compare to the corporate form.  The topics studied include: rights of creditors to hold principals of the enterprise liable; distribution of control within the corporations; fiduciary duties of directors and officers; key aspects of the federal securities laws (including the regulation of insider trading and proxies); organic changes (such as mergers); shifts in control (such as takeovers and freeze-outs); and legal implications of the roles of corporations in society.  The course introduces some of the specialized concepts explored in detail in courses on Securities Regulation and Corporate Finance.

Phillips

 

 

4 Credits

 

*Criminal Trial Practice (Limited to 16 with third year preference)– Lectures on cases tried in state and federal courts, from arrest to appeal, are used to highlight criminal trial practice.  One case is used throughout in which students are assigned roles including defense attorney, prosecutor, judge, witness (expert and lay), juror, clerk and defendant.  Materials are based on actual cases.  Emphasis is on federal criminal trials. 

Tumposky

 

2 Credits

 

Education Law – A survey of current issues in U.S. education law including high stakes testing, “No Child Left Behind”, the charter school movement, vouchers, church/state issues, home schooling and school funding.

O’Connell

 

3 Credits

 

Employment Discrimination – This course focuses on the rights of workers to be free of discrimination in the workplace, and the obligations of employers to provide a discrimination-free workplace.  Emphasis is placed on the scope and limitations of fair employment statutes, including definitions of employee and employer, types of actionable discrimination, shifting burdens of proof and other definitional or procedural issues that frequently determine the outcome of cases.  This course will primarily address Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, but will also cover other state and federal anti-discrimination laws.  We will not only discuss litigation, but will also address approaches that responsible employers might take to develop effective anti-discrimination policies.

J. Davis

 

3 Credits

 

 

Employment Law – Job Security & Rights – This course surveys the legal and policy issues concerning the employment relationship, focusing on hiring and firing, job security, non-competition agreements, job-related intellectual property, employer control of employee conduct on- and off-duty rights, employee privacy, mass dismissals and plant closings and employment arbitration.  The problems of low-wage workers receive special emphasis.

Spieler

 

3 Credits

 

 

 

*Evidence (Limited to 60) – This course examines how courtroom lawyers use the evidence rules to present their cases – notably, rules regarding relevance, hearsay, impeachment, character, and experts.  The approach to the study of evidence will be primarily through the “problem” method – that is, applying the provisions of the Federal Rules of Evidence to concrete courtroom situations.  Theoretical issues will be explored as a way to deepen the student’s appreciation of how the evidence rules can and ought to be used in litigation.

Givelber

 

4 Credits

 

Family Law – This is a basic course in family law and family policy.  The first half of the course explores state regulation of intimate relationships, asking what purposed marriage serves, and looking at the law of incest, polygamy and same sex marriage.  The second half of the course examines practical problems in family law: cohabitants’ rights; common law marriage; and the many issues relating to divorce, with a particular focus on money and children.

Adler

 

3 Credits

 

Global AIDS Policy Seminar – The global HIV/AIDS pandemic, the preeminent public health and human rights challenge of our time, is structured by biological, economic, social, and cultural forces ranging from thee arcane structures of the international intellectual property regime to the cultural norms that prefigure sexual intimacy.  This seminar will explore selected policy options for reversing and responding to the time of infection.  Pharmaceutical research, development, and access, neo-liberal economic and trade policies, gender relations and prevention policies, global health initiatives and primary health systems, health care policy and health worker migration – these and many other topics will be the subject of classroom discussion and student research papers.

Baker

 

3 Credits

 

Health Law – This course examines the legal regulation of the provision of health care services.  Much of the focus is on the relationship between law and health care policy.  Topics include access to health insurance and health care, health care financing, malpractice liability, the organization and responsibility of health care institutions, especially hospitals, the regulation of the quality of care and the formulation of health policy.

J. Abrams

 

3 Credits

 

Human Behavior, Legal Doctrine & Regulatory Design – This course will compare accounts of human behavior, including the Utilitarian/Law and Economics view of man as a rational calculator of his self-interest, with classical and contemporary alternatives to that description, including Behavioral Economic.  We will evaluate the reasons for doubting or crediting these competing accounts, and will then consider their implications for determining appropriate legal doctrines and regulatory approaches.  For example, we may consider whether the views of human behavior which shape consumer protection case law and the Supreme Court’s commercial speech doctrine are justified, and whether – and in what circumstances – regulations are appropriate which seek to help people by prescribing, proscribing, or “nudging” their behavior.  Students are expected to participate in class and write a research paper which may satisfy the writing requirement.

Daynard

 

3 Credits

 

Immigration Law – This course is designed to give the student an overview of U.S. immigration law through an examination of relevant statutes, regulations, and case law.  It focuses on both the substantive and procedural aspects of immigration law and provides a historical analysis of the changes in our immigration laws and policies.  Topics covered include non-immigrant and immigrant classifications, the preference system for immigrant visas, grounds of inadmissibility and deportability, relief from removal, asylum, citizen ship, administrative and judicial review, and the immigration consequences of crimes.

Rosenbloom

 

3 Credits

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside Counsel

Mostyn

 

Intellectual Property – In our modern day ‘information economy,’ the law of intellectual property has taken on enormous importance to both creators and users of intellectual creations.  This course introduces students to the classis principles of copyright, patent, trademark and trade secret law and explores the ways in which those principles are shifting and adapting in response to new technology.

Bennett

 

3 Credits

 

*International and Foreign Legal Research (Limited to 20) – This course is designed to teach students how to research international and foreign legal materials.  The course uses a combination of lectures, hand-on research exercises, and homework assignments.  Students will have opportunities (1) to increase the quality of research by attaining substantive knowledge on international legal topics and the legal system in which their issues arise; (2) to attain practical skills, to brainstorm search terms, formulate issues, and evaluate legal research resources by reiterative process; and (3) to increase flexibility and confidence in researching international and foreign law topics.  Some topics covered include: U.S. and non-U.S. treaties, international custom, jurisprudence, and the documents of the United Nations, the European Union, and NGOs.  The class will also explore research in topical areas such as human rights, Immigration and Refugee Laws and foreign laws.

J. Lee

 

2 Credits

 

International Law – This foundation course introduces students to fundamental concepts and unresolved problems in international law.  Students are introduced to the sources of international law and to methods of international dispute resolution in domestic and international fora.  This course explores the part that international law has played (or failed to play) in the prevention or conduct of war, the promotion of human rights and international economic development.  We discuss historical and contemporary theoretical debates about the roles and utility of international law to many areas of domestic practice.  This course is a foundational course for most advanced public and private international law courses.

Lewis

 

3 Credits

 

*Labor Arbitration Workshop (Limited to 24) – In this workshop, students will explore the important role of alternative dispute resolution in the workplace.  Using court and arbitration decisions as well as supplementary materials, students will discuss the relationship between arbitration and the judicial system, a union’s duty of fair representation, issues of arbitrability, evidence and procedure, as well as a variety of substantive contractual issues normally addressed in arbitration, such as seniority, fringe benefits, wages and hours, subcontracting and union security.  In particular, the course will focus on “just cause” discharge and discipline cases.  Although there are no prerequisites or co-requisites, Labor Law I is recommended.  During the course of the quarter, students will draft an arbitration brief based on a transcript of a hearing and participate in an arbitration simulation using witnesses and documentary evidence.

R. Abrams

 

3 Credits

 

Labor Law I – A general introduction to the law of labor relations through an examination of the National Labor Relations Act and leading cases, in conjunction with historical, social and economic materials.  Topics include organization, union recognition, unfair labor practices and collective bargaining.

Sills

 

4 Credits

 

Land Use – A survey of legal doctrines, techniques and institutions relating to regulation of the use of real property.  Topics covered include constitutional questions of takings by public agencies, the scope of the police power as it affects land use and the basic techniques of zoning and subdivision control.  Students study, among other issues, recent cases on exclusion of low income housing, current techniques to encourage housing development (inclusionary or “linkage” regulations) and First Amendment questions arising from land use controls.

Breckenridge

 

3 Credits

 

Law of Financial Institutions – This course will survey the complex regulatory regime governing the operations of commercial baking organizations in the United States.  The primary focus will be on federal regulation of banks and bank holding companies.  Nevertheless there will also, of necessity, be coverage of federal regulation of other types of depository institutions and holding companies – such as credit unions, savings associations, and savings and loan holding companies – as well as of state regulation of depository institutions and their holding companies.  Current issues relating to bank mergers, diversification of baking organizations into other forms of financial and commercial activities (including securities and insurance), regulatory responses to specific problems (such as capital adequacy, deposit insurance, limitations on lending authority, anti-money laundering and anti-terrorism initiatives) will be considered.

Grinspoon

 

3 Credits

 

*Legal Writing Workshop (limited to 16 & 3rd year preference) – This course is for students who wish to strengthen their writing and analytic skills.  The first part of the course will focus on objective writing.  Students will work on an office memorandum analyzing a statute and case law.  The classes will focus on large scale organization, small scale organization, case analysis, and revising your own work.  The second part of the course will focus on your own work.  The second part of the course will focus on persuasive writing and research.  Students will research and draft an appellate brief based on a constitutional issue, paying particular attention to persuasive writing techniques.  The appellate brief will fulfill the upper level writing requirement.  The entire course will focus on writing concisely, using citations accurately, and other skills essential to effective legal writing.

Bresler

 

3 Credits

 

Modern Real Estate Development – This course will explore the basic elements of commercial real estate transactions, with a focus on the acquisition and financing of real estate development.  We will discuss the economic considerations (including basic tax benefits) and risk elements of real estate development, as well as some of the emerging trends in real estate development and their theoretical implication.  We will give limited consideration to residential real estate transactions.  An affordable housing transaction will serve as the basis for the course discussions.  Course materials will include typical transactional documents.  During the term, one or more in-class drafting exercises will be included to help focus the discussion of the issues.

Rubin

 

3 Credits

 

*Negotiation (Limited to 24) – Negotiation is a course in which students study theories of negotiation and apply those theories in simulated disputes and transactions which are then debriefed in class.  The course focuses on: (1) negotiation planning, (2) case preparation and evaluation, (3) client counseling and informed client consent, (4) analysis of the bargaining range and principled concession patterns, (5) competitive, cooperative and problem-solving strategies, 96) information bargaining, (7) ethics and (8) critiques of negotiation patterns and institutions.  Students are required to turn in preparation materials and to keep weekly journals, reviewed by the instructor, addressing their experiences in, and thoughts about negotiations.  Students are encouraged to internalize habits of analysis, prediction, preparation, and flexibility and to become more self-evaluative for their future negotiating experiences.

Baker

 

3 Credits

 

**Poverty Law and Practice Clinic (Limited to 6 or 12 with preference for 3Ls and fluent Spanish speakers) – The twenty hours a week spent in the clinic provides an opportunity for students to provide direct representation to clients confronting legal challenges as they try to balance family and work responsibilities.  Students have complete responsibility for a range of clients under the supervision of a faculty member.  Students interview, research, plan, investigate, counsel, negotiate, and advocate for their clients.  The clinic encourages students to maintain a client-centered focus and looks to extend the experience beyond the problem of the individual to the benefit for the community.  The clinic also provides an opportunity to work in collaboration with a community organization in order to experience collaborative efforts for systemic change for low income clients.

Rowan & Holohan

 

6 Credits

 

*Pretrial Civil Practice and Advocacy (Limited to 16) – This course provides the foundation to manage the pretrial phase of a civil action.  Each class will consist of a lecture concerning an aspect of pretrial practice, followed by a student conducted pretrial advocacy.  Using model civil cases, the students will engage in most types of pretrial practice, including an initial client interview and basic legal analysis to evaluate and assert potential legal claims and defenses, witness selection and preparation, deposition and written discovery practice, dispositive motions, pretrial memoranda and settlement positions.  Evidence is a prerequisite.

Leifer

 

2 Credits

 

Professional Responsibility – This course focuses on the legal, ethical and professional dilemmas encountered by lawyers.  The course emphasis is on dealing with these dilemmas in the everyday practice of law while understanding the underlying issues and gaining a perspective within which to evaluate them.

M. Davis

 

3 Credits

 

*Public Health Legal Clinic (Limited to 8) – This clinic supports the work of the public Health Advocacy Institute, a Northeastern-based think tank.  It provides students with an opportunity to gain experience in public interest law, health law, and the use of litigation to effect changes in public health policy.  The clinic’s primary focus will be tobacco control and on the emerging issue of obesity-related litigation and policy, cut students may explore other public health-related topics as well.  This clinic also provides a unique opportunity for students to develop their academic legal writing skills; the final project in this course is the equivalent of a law review article.  In addition to weekly class readings and discussions, each student will work on a major research project throughout the quarter, meet regularly with the instructor to discuss the project, give an oral presentation to the class, and write a substantial paper discussing his/her research.

 

 

Social Welfare Law –This course examines American public assistance as a legal institution.  After reviewing the historical, sociological and juridical roots of the welfare system, students examine the laws governing major assistance programs, especially eligibility requirements, rules governing grant determination, work and family rules, and procedural rights.  Primary emphasis is on statutory and regulatory construction.  The course explores methods by which lawyers can deal with the system: advocacy in the administrative process, litigation, legislative reform and representation of recipient organizations.

Williams

 

3 Credits

 

Sports Law (Limited) – This course explores the legal, economic and social aspects of national and international professional and amateur sports.  The course will focus on judicial, administrative, legislative and private decisions that have created a cohesive body of principles for the resolution of disputes involving athletes, clubs, leagues, spectators, and fans.  These decisions address issues off antitrust, labor, tort, agency, and constitutional law.  We will pay particular attention to the governance of sports, player reservation systems and player contracts, collective bargaining and salary arbitration, franchise free agency, violence in sports, NCAA rules and regulations, gender and handicapped discrimination, and sports agents.  Students will draft a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor.

R. Abrams

 

3 Credits

 

Trusts and Estates – This basic course covers all aspects of inheritance, including intestacy, wills, common modern will substitutes, trusts, and future interests, with attention to rights of spouses and children, charitable interest, fiduciary duty, and other issues.  The focus is practical, and students are required to write numerous short exercises – including analysis, planning advice, and formal drafting – to address realistic problems

Campia

 

4 Credits